Thank u, next gen: Ariana Grande and HeadCount are motivating a new generation of voters

Ariana Grande has capitalized on the hype of her upcoming tour, Sweetener, and partnered with HeadCount, an organization that works with musicians to register voters at  concerts. HeadCount is looking for volunteers to manage registration tables at concerts nationwide. Voting is one of the rights given to citizens when they reach the age of 18.…

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Essay: Social Media’s Effects on Teenagers

The fluidity of apps such as Facebook and Instagram allowed people of various backgrounds and ideologies the ability to exchange knowledge, information, and ideas on an international level. Social media is defined as applications and websites that give users the ability to share content. In fact, Statista estimates that in 2021, the number of worldwide…

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Medicine Mismanaged: What Science Owes To People of Color

All great medical advances owe some degree of their success to sacrifice. Donated organs give us a better understanding of our body’s processes, clinical trials for treatments require human test subjects and surgery would never have been created without someone putting their life on the line in the name of science. As risky as they…

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Activism for the Uninspired

With a recent spike in hate crimes, government shutdowns, the prospect of losing protections for minorities and the dissemination of fake news, many Americans are now feeling more compelled to get involved in activism then they were a year or two ago. While participating in massive protests, phone banks and local politics are all great…

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Astounding Asians: Yoshiko Kawashima

*I will be using the gender-neutral pronoun “they” since Kawashima’s gender identity is unknown.   Here’s somebody you won’t learn about in history class. *Yoshiko Kawashima. Chinese traitor,  Japanese commander and the genderqueer bisexual legend we all deserve.  Originally named Xianyu, Kawashima was born a Beijing princess in 1907. It wasn’t until they were eight…

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Astounding Asians: Zohra Segal

Zohra Mumtaz-ullah Khan, also known as Zohra Segal, was an Indian actress, choreographer, and dancer who inspired millions over the course of 70 years through her work. As one of the earliest indian actresses to achieve international profile, Segal lived a life full of energy and zest. Born in 1912 into a traditional Muslim family…

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Female Contribution to Visual Art

Historically, whether it be 200 CE or the 20th century, the world art scene hasn’t been particularly kind to the female gender. The art world was—and still is—a man’s world. Women have always been artists, but often items such as quilts, generally considered to be a female art form, go unrecognized as fine art. In…

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The Feminist’s Bookshelf: Women’s History Month Edition

In honor of International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month, I’ve compiled a list of books that were written by women and/or feature strong female characters. These are some of my favorites, so enjoy! milk and honey, Rupi Kaur “you tell me to quiet down cause my opinions make me less beautiful but i was…

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KitTea Cat Cafe

What’s a better way to destress than drinking tea while petting a cat? Located in San Francisco, KitTea is the Bay Area’s only cat cafe. With its minimalistic room decor and high cat-to-human ratio, KitTea provides a uniquely relaxing experience.

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A “Who’s Who” of the Trump Administration

President-elect Trump has more than 4,000 government positions to fill, some of which are the most important jobs in the United States of America. While some Cabinet positions, such as the Attorney General or Secretary of State require Senate confirmation, other important posts such as the Chief of Staff and Press Secretary are under complete control of the President.

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